Thursday, April 23, 2015

the continuing story of beads

Hi, it's Anne Marie again! My pieces always start off with a colour, shape, object, or germ of an idea. I work intuitively, so am reluctant to sketch, or commit anything to paper. Although frustrating at times, it seems to work! I start with a shape &/or theme, choose and attach the main focal (always with an off-centre placement), audition clusters of beads and found objects, take a quick photo, then begin stitching. Depending on the size, I may decide to add smaller focals/clusters, and possibly a path (linear division). As I get closer to the edge, I flatten the texture, using a unifying stitch (moss/boucle), and size 11 seed beads. Where do I get my ideas, you say? Imagination, dreams, and the stash of a magpie! ..... I pull the colours from my main focal (but not always), gather a bunch of beads, shop if I must, and then start stitching. Somewhere in this process, the piece starts talking to me, and the flow begins. Trust your instincts, listen to your imagination, don't worry about the end result, tell a story, and just focus on the joy of the process! I leave you with photos of some of my 2013 and 2014 Bead Journal Project pieces.
The little houses, in my 2012 series, all include a number(s), corresponding to the month, a vintage button, and one or more buttons from the family button jar. My unifying theme for the 2014 series, is the shapes of the leaves (collected in the fall of 2012). I love to blend techniques, and include gifted items, found objects, and recycled items in my pieces. I challenge you to include some in your art! If you'd like to see/read more, I invite you to wander over to my blog.

10 comments:

  1. These really are gorgeous. What sort of size are they?

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  2. Thanks Maggi! The houses are 4", and the leaves range in size from 3" to around 5". All fairly small. The fibre/bead pieces in the post on the 21st, are 6" square.

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  3. I studied each piece enlarged and found them fascinating. It's like hide and seek looking for each added bit. You are inspirational.

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  4. Maggi... I can't even imagine the hundreds of hours you have spent with the design and stitch of these amazing pieces. Like Beth above, I have enlarged the photos to study the treasures within each piece. Love your work!
    Bethany
    www.fibreworkskingston.blogspot.ca

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  5. My Apology, Anne Marie.. I started previous post with Maggi's name after reading her comment! I knew it was you... so sorry! One day I will see your work as I pass through Toronto from Kingston.
    Bethany

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  6. I'll repeat what Beth said! You are SO inspirational!!! How will I get on with my day after exploring your incredible blog?! Now I want to make paper bowls, beaded lovelies, .....

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  7. Sorry, for the delay in thanking everyone, but thank you very much for all of your lovely comments! I've been teaching an out-of-town and in town workshop, so my time has not been my own.

    I love hiding unusual items in my pieces, and it delights me that others take pleasure in this part of my work. The hunt mor materials, is very important to me.

    Chris, LOL! I've been thinking about bowls lately....it's time I made some more!

    Bethany, I'd love to get together with you one day, and was going to email you, but couldn't find a contact link. Perhaps we could arrange to meet during one of your Fibre shows. Now that the weather is better, I'd enjoy the drive up to Kingston.

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  8. amazing. I never thought of having a focal point to beading. That opens up all kinds of wonder! thanks

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  9. Thanks, Elle! Think of Intuitive Bead Embroidery as painting with beads. All the same rules apply, but it just takes longer, and you use a smaller substrate.

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We would love to hear from you and even better have some links to your work!