Sunday, February 3, 2013

Scrunch Dyeing Variations - Part 2


FREEZE DYEING
  
For a variation on the regular scrunch I described in Part 1, I wanted to include freeze dyeing.
This piece was scrunched, put in a bucket, then I placed it in my freezer for about an hour:
















When I removed it from the freezer, the fabric had frozen solid.  Then I poured the dyes over the same way I did in the first example, only I left it to batch for about 6 hours to allow the fabric to ‘defrost’ before I rinsed/laundered.  Below is the frozen fabric with dyes applied.


















 Here is the Freeze dyed fabric:
















It looks similar to the regular scrunch dyed piece, although the
markings are different… more pronounced, with more contrast between
light and dark.
ICE CUBE DYEING
Here's another way to alter your results when scrunching.  For this method, I placed ice cubes over the scrunched fabric:











Then I sprinkled dye powder in the 3 colors over the cubes and left it to batch for about 6 hours before I rinsed/laundered:














Here is the ice cube dyed piece:
















I did not use a lot of the avocado in this piece, and wish I had used more.
I decided to try another ice cube dye piece, only instead of using dye powder, I wanted to use liquid dyes, and instead of my usual 2 tsp dye powder per 8 ounces of water, I doubled the amount of dye powder in mixed dyes.  In other words, I used 4 tsp dye powder per 8 ounces of water.  Here is the result of the 2x ice cube dye:
  















I like the markings here, but it seems a little faded looking compared to methods 1 and 2… still, it does have visual interest! 
In my next post, I'm going to show you a few more experiments then we'll do a side by side comparison of the results.  I hope you're busy dyeing by now, because I want to hear all about your experiments!

10 comments:

  1. Very interesting. I used ice cubes before with highly pigments liquid dyes. I am a big fan of pinks and green (just a slight shift from purple and green, my fav). I think the batch I like the best is dye powder on ice. Very interesting techniques. I LOVE dye!

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  2. Very interesting techniques - especially the ice cube one. Snow dyeing is just too seasonal but there are always ice cubes around. Thanks for posting!

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  3. I love the vibrant colors and textures you get from scrunch dyeing, either into a tight container with liquid dyes or with ice . To see some of my experiments go to: and to:

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  4. It's me again. Here's where you can go to see my ice dyed experiments. Sorry I didn't link it correctly in my last comment. Hopefully this will work.
    http://jeanneairdartfabricandquilts.blogspot.com/2012/12/ice-dyeing.html
    There's more information on my flickr page, which you can link to from my blog.

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  5. You are making incredible art and I love the tutorials :)
    Thank you for sharing your technique.
    Your blogging sister, Connie :)

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  6. Stay tuned -- I did some snow-dyeing this weekend...

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  7. I've been wanting to try some ice dyeing for awhile. Now I have a good excuse to get busy. Thanks for the good tutorials.

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  8. Loving this. The scrunch and I are old pals. I do love the serendipity of it all. But I never thought to freeze the soda soaked cloth--interesting. Thanks, Judy!

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  9. @Beth#3 - I did some snow dyeing previously and finally got to use some of it. It is titled "Shattered Lives" in my 12X12 gallery on my website: www.KellyLHendrickson.com

    I used a red snow dyed fabric and fussy cut it for the wine spilling out of the glass.

    Also used some snow dyes in a recent piece "Fiddler On The Roof" It is posted on my blog: www.kellyartist.blogspot.com

    Ask and you shall receive!!

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  10. I really like using small, softer ice cubes for my ice dyeing. I feel like a get more of the crispness from the smaller cubes.

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