A TECHNIQUE DRIVEN Blog dedicated to mastery of surface design techniques. First we dye, overdye, paint, stitch, resist, tie, fold, silk screen, stamp, thermofax, batik, bejewel, stretch, shrink, sprinkle, Smooch, fuse, slice, dice, AND then we set it on fire using a variety of heat tools.

Monday, April 6, 2015

Guestblogger Joke Hardenbol part 1


Hello , I am Joke Hardenbol. 
Beth asked me if I was willing to write 3 blogpost as a guest this month and although I felt honored by this invitation my first response was to turn it down as I don’t feel my English is good enough for this. But when she offered to have my post translated by Wil Opio Oguta I accepted the invitation.
This first post is about a piece of art which Beth loves. My wall hanging  ‘Blue Silence’. There is a story behind this title. I had lost this wall hanging for a month and finally found it again in the garden where I had hung it on the barn wall to take a picture. I took the camera indoors but forgot to bring the wall hanging in. When I am indoors I cannot see this wall and during  winter I do not go into this part of the garden so it was left there for a month. Luckily it survived without any harm done. Because of this month of silence and an embellishment which is  about silence it got the name ‘Blue Silence’.
I wanted to create a piece that consisted out of separate pieces connected by embroidery. That was my starting point. Plus I wanted to work with texture. I started with a white piece of fabric backed by Hobbs and stitched and glued several  different materials on it, all with a texture, amongst them were mulberry bark, handmade paper and cheese cloth. When I felt that I had enough texture, I put everything in a dye bath. A mixture of red and turquoise that gave a lovely blue/purple color. With discharge paste and a spiral stamp made by me I did the mint green spirals. No idea what would happen as I had never worked with discharge paste, but I got an awesome contrasting color.


Based upon the texture I used a rotary cutter and cut the fabric into separate pieces. Stitched these together again using different type of stitches.


The next step was to make embellishments out of Tyvek. I made several beads wrapped them with seed beads and flowers. A number of them have been embroidered with sequins. Embroidery followed and I added some text using foam and stamps. Final touch was to add a bit of gold colored shoeshine with my fingers so that only the higher areas were touched by it.

15 comments:

  1. Nice to see you and your lovely work her Joke. Beautiful piece and a very nice blue color...

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  2. Wonderful piece, Joke! Thank you so much for sharing it with us! I'm very inspired by your use of stitching to connect the pieces. And thanks to Wil for translating for you! We fiber artists work and play well together, don't we? ;-)

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  3. What a stunning piece of fiber art! I love the story about leaving it on the barn and am happy there was no harm that came to it. Someday I want to make a piece that is in parts. I am glad that you decided to share with us.

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  4. This piece is beautiful, and the name is perfect!

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  5. Really interesting. Thank you for sharing

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  6. Of course I LOVE this piece and I'm so glad you shared it with a whole new audience!!

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  7. A very beautiful piece. It is fun to know all of the steps you went through. I'm glad you found it!

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  8. Beth has a great taste ;-) love this piece as well and reading about your work is very inspiring!

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  9. What a wonderful piece! Thank you for explaining your processes. Those discharged marks are especially lovely.

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  10. Thank you all for your comments! I'm blushing.

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  11. A gorgeous piece and beautifully done.

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  12. it is a beautiful piece of work Joke , I like the colors very much

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  13. Your work is so beautiful. Thank you for guest blogging, and for telling about your process in making this piece.

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  14. This is marvelous. Such colours and texture!

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